Monday, September 3, 2018

Fall Election Special: Political Thuggery and Party Identities


Fall Election Special: Political Thuggery and Party Identities
(The Way We Live Now, Part Three)





Source: Michael Valdon; U.S. Congress, photo via Wikimedia Commons; State of Florida, photo via Wikimedia Commons; photo via Wikimedia Commons (BY SA 4.0)

 Author’s Note: This is the third installment in a series on the current public climate of fear and intimidation that has dominated national life in the United States since the kick-off of the last presidential campaign in 2015. Part One, “The Emotional Toll of Public Bullying and Political Intimidation,” focused on the experience of the sheer power and psychological effects of bullying in general and public bullying and political intimidation in particular. Part Two, “How Political Bullying and Intimidation Work: A Practical Guide,” looked at how public bullying works as a concrete method and set of political tools and provided readers with a map through this potent minefield and a way to anticipate future acts of aggression.

Aggression and Response

With Labor Day marking the official start of Congressional and local races, in Part Three I focus on the two major political parties to explore why over the years Republicans and their right-wing supporters have freely resorted to extremely aggressive political tactics—and just as important--why Democratic Party leaders and their liberal allies have often failed to take seriously such acts of political violence and skullduggery by their opponents and respond accordingly. Part of the answer, I argue, lies in their respective practices of loyalty and identity, social composition, and conceptions of governing.

Monday, July 30, 2018

The Way We Live Now, Part Two: How Political Bullying and Intimidation Work--A Practical Guide


Part Two:


How Political Bullying and Intimidation Work: A Practical Guide


Roddey Reid




Source: Michael Valdon; Pixbay.com/photo; Alex Jones: Sean P. Anderson (Dallas, TX)


Author’s Note: this is the second installment in a series on the current public climate of fear and intimidation that since the kick-off of the last presidential campaign in 2015 has dominated national life in the United States to a degree not seen in a long while. In Part One, “The Emotional Toll of Public Bullying and Political Intimidation,” the focus was on the experience of the sheer power and psychological effects of bullying in general and public bullying and political intimidation in particular. Below in Part Two, I now look at how public bullying works as a concrete method and set of political tools: I examine specific devices and tactics that will provide readers something of a practical guide through this potent minefield and a way to anticipate future acts of aggression. As we approach the midterm elections, the hope is to provide readers with some protective mental armor against the daily barrage of assaults.


Roddey Reid is Professor Emeritus, UC San Diego (rreid@ucsd.edu). He is author of  Confronting Political intimidation and Public Bullying: A Citizen’s Handbook for the Trump Era and Beyond (2017) and hosts “UnSafe Thoughts,” a blog on bullying and the fluidity of politics in dangerous times. He is a member of Indivisible San Francisco.
 

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Alley Cat Books, San Francisco presents Roddey Reid, "The Way We Live Now: The Emotional & Political Toll of Public Bullying and Intimidation and Its Challenge to Activism," Thurs., July 19, 7pm


Alley Cat Books, San Francisco

Presents

Local author Roddey Reid


The Way We Live Now:
The Emotional & Political Toll of 
Public Bullying and Intimidation and 
Its Challenge to Activism

Discussion of his book
  
Confronting Political Intimidation
 and Public Bullying: A Citizen's Handbook 
for the Trump Era and Beyond

Thursday, July 19, 7pm

3036 24th St.
San Francisco, CA  94110

What is political bullying vs. other kinds of bullying? How does it work?
Why do political intimidation and bullying seem worse now? 
What is their emotional and political toll?
How is the current harsh public climate a challenge to public life and activism

Roddey Reid is Professor Emeritus, University of California, San Diego, where he taught classes on the modern cultures and societies of the U.S., France, and Japan. His latest writing has been on trauma, daily life, and the culture of intimidation and bullying in the U.S. and Europe. He hosts a personal blog called “UnSafe Thoughts” on bullying and the fluidity of politics in dangerous times. He is a member of the San Francisco chapter of Indivisble.org, the activist group that was formed in December 2016 and now has over 6,000 chapters nationwide.

Atchison Village Social Club Meet Authors: Confronting Political Intimidation and Public Bullying with Roddey Reid, July 20, 7pm


Atchison Village Social Club

Meet the Authors & Book Reading
Community Hall

270 Curry St., Richmond, CA 94801



Discussion
with
Roddey Reid
Professor Emeritus, UC San Diego
Friday, July 20

7:00 pm
Community Hall
270 Curry St., Richmond, CA 94801 


What is political bullying vs. other kinds of bullying? How does it work?
Why do political intimidation and bullying seem worse now? 
What is their emotional and political toll?
How is the current harsh public climate a challenge to public life and civic action

Roddey Reid is ProfessorEmeritus, University of California, San Diego, where he taught classes on the modern cultures and societies of the U.S., France, and Japan. His latest writing has been on trauma, daily life, and the culture of intimidation and bullying in the U.S. and Europe. He hosts a personal blog called “UnSafe Thoughts” on bullying and the fluidity of politics in dangerous times. He is a member of the San Francisco chapter of Indivisble.org, the activist group that was formed in December 2016 and now has over 6,000 chapters nationwide.

Sunday, June 10, 2018

The Way We Live Now, Part One: The Emotional Toll of Public Bullying & Political Intimidation






Part One:
The Emotional Toll of Public Bullying and Political Intimidation




Source: Michael Valdon; Pixbay.com/photo; Alex Jones: Sean P. Anderson (Dallas, TX)

Author’s Note: this is the first installment in a series on the current public climate of fear and intimidation that since the kick-off of the last presidential campaign in 2015 has dominated national life in the United States. In particular I look at how this toxic environment has poisoned our politics and even reached into our very relationships with friends, co-workers, neighbors, and family members. Next up is Part Two: “How the Public Climate of Fear and Intimidation Works.”